Strawberry Season

Well folks we’re certainly in the thick of the strawberry season now.

It’s a good idea at this time of year to get out there and check the condition of your strawberry plants. Keeping them clean and healthy is the key to good yields.

Strawberries really are one of the easiest and most rewarding plants to have in your garden. You just need to make sure that they are planted in free draining soil that has been enriched with compost and sheep or cow manure (well, that’s just my preference!). It is a common practice to mound your soil, this is to ensure good drainage and it is certainly a good idea. Oh and don’t bother with black plastic, this is an agricultural technique and absolutely not necessary in the home garden.

Pruning your strawberries:

Use a nice clean pair of scissors to snip away dead or yellowing leaves. Cut low to the base of the plant to prevent left over leaf stems rotting and causing fungal problems. I like to use either a sharp pointed pair of scissors or nail scissors so that I can get deep down into the plant and also to avoid cutting healthy leaves. It can be a delicate job but definitely not a hard or time consuming one.

Don’t mind my dirty pot, I had a few other pots standing around it and it kept getting splashed with potting mix when I watered them. It’s beautiful and clean now but, I really should have cleaned it before my photos =) oops!

I do grow my strawberries in the garden by the way but, I have been testing some strawberries in the greensmart pot. They have done exceptionally well. I will have to replace the potting mix every second season to prevent disease and maintain the vigour of the plants.

Now, please don’t tug at the spent leaves as you will disturb the roots and possibly break your crowns. You don’t want that!

I give my strawberries a thorough clean up about twice a year. That said, I look at them often and if I see bits I don’t like they get the snip! I love my strawberries (and my plants) so I give them a bit of love from time to time and boy do they thank me for it. “Checkin’ the strawbs” it’s just one of those regular things I do when I’m wandering around my garden and it only takes a few seconds.

FYI – about 30 plants will be sufficient to feed a family of four. If you can’t afford to buy 30 plants in one hit well, fair enough! Buy what you can when you can. Buying them bare rooted can be quite an economical way to do it. If you look after your plants you will be able to propagate them as their runners develop during summer. When they have taken root snip off the runner and you’ll have a new plant to add to your collection.

One quick thing – when you harvest your strawberries leave a bit of the stem on as I have done in my picture below. These are a couple of my White Frais De Bois strawberries that I just picked now after tucking my chooks into bed. They may be tiny but they taste like sherbet and we love!

Frais De Bois

Check in tomorrow to see what I did with my strawberry harvest! Oh-la-la!

I think it might be a great time for a few strawberry recipes.

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4 responses to this post.

  1. Jodi – you are an inspiration! For some reason I thought my strawberry season was finishing up because they had already yielded so much and I am now getting so much fungal spoilage and pest damage.

    I went out today to clean up my plants as you described, and sure enough they are still loaded with flowers, and now they look a million times better!

    Thank you so much for continuing to share your knowledge – I don’t always comment, but I read religiously 🙂

    Reply

  2. […] was J and I maintaining our strawberries after reading about the process on Jodi’s fabulous blog. I think I learn something from every single one of Jodi’s […]

    Reply

  3. Love this thank you. I must tend to mine!!

    Reply

  4. […] I spent a few hours out there with scissors, snipping the dead material out close to the crown of the plant. Jodi describes the process really well here. […]

    Reply

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